The world of work

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Having decided to take time out of medicine for at least the next eight months, I needed to find something to fill that time. Whilst it would have been wonderful to go travelling and disappear to the other side of the world for nine months, the lack of funds and parental judgement prohibited me from doing so. As a result, I had to get a job. Not just any job either but a job that had some sort of relevance, potential for career progression, and would at least help me work out what the hell I want to do with my life.

Through some good luck, I was able to secure a position as a junior medical writer for a medical and healthcare communications company in a pretty short space of time. Medical communications, or ‘medcomms’, is an interesting industry I came across when exploring other options beyond medicine. The role of medcomms agencies is a somewhat intermediary one. They work with pharmaceutical companies to help communicate the clinical trial data of new drugs to healthcare professionals and those outside the pharmaceutical world (mostly with the aim of marketing drugs and making the big bucks for drug companies).

My first couple of weeks in the job have been fairly relaxed. As it’s my first ever full-time job post-university, I think I’m being eased into it all quite nicely. I’ll be honest, there were some periods where I was incredibly bored reading about diabetes, but work has since picked up a little and I’m being given a steady flow of tasks to work on. My work at the moment is mainly putting clinical trial data into a presentable and comprehensible presentation, as well as researching new and interesting studies on diabetes to report.

For some, this job may not be the most exhilarating and life-changing job. But in all honesty, I’ve been more content with the steady 9-5 life I’ve had the last couple weeks than the chaos that was medical school and clinical placements. I’ve been able to enjoy myself in my own time and not have what I call ‘study guilt’ constantly hanging over my head. Things with this job may change: it may get busy and stressful and I’ll come to hate it; or it could challenge me and open my mind to a totally different world of work which I end up enjoying.

I’m just going to see how it goes. At the very least, I’m getting paid.

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One thought on “The world of work

  1. Hey Lisa,

    Just stumbled across your blog from the Junior Doctor’s Contract page on Facebook, and just wanted to say that I’m a fourth year medical student at Birmingham who can relate to a lot of what you have written about. Last year I took a year out of medicine (after having intercalated doing English Literature and Philosophy and seeing how freeing the world outside of medicine can be) and I think it is the best decision I ever made. Just wanted to say I really admire you for voicing your struggles with medicine, and to say that you are certainly not alone in the way you feel, and I hope you find your time out refreshing and enlightening, and that you make the most out of it! If you ever want to chat about your experience/ worries feel free to drop me a line, I know it can be daunting transitioning back into medicine or considering taking the leap to leave it altogether – I’m still toeing that line myself and I’m no expert but can empathise!

    Talia
    TME074@student.bham.ac.uk

    Like

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